Index to Ming Dynasty Paintings

Index to Ming Dynasty Paintings.

Compiled by James Cahill (Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley) and hosted by Harvard Fine Arts Library, this resource “contains over 10,000 records including three types of data: 1) artist biographies, 2) artwork descriptions and 3) a bibliography covering the Ming Dynasty period, mid-fourteenth through mid-seventeenth centuries in China.” Please note that in addition to English and Asian characters, Wade-Giles (instead of pinyin) is also used the database entries.

This resource continues An index of early Chinese painters and paintings: T’ang, Sung, and Yüan, a print publication also by Prof. Cahill.

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Electronic Index to the Early Shenbao 申報

Electronic Index to the Early Shenbao 申報.

Developed at the Institute of Chinese Studies, University of Heidelberg, this resource provides quick keyword access to more than 11,000 articles published in Shenbao from 1872-1898. The index covers all leading articles from the Shenbao, articles reprinted from Hong Kong papers (such as the early Xunhuan Ribao edited by Wang Tao), and selected news reports, official documents, and letters to the editor. Excluded from the index are most poetry, reprints of the Jingbao (Peking Gazette), and advertisements.

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Daozang suoyin 道藏索引

Daozang suoyin 道藏索引.

Developed at the Institute of Chinese Studies, University of Heidelberg, this resource is a digitized version of the Daozang index published in 1996. No fulltext search capability is provided, though.

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Nichibunken Databases

Nichibunken Databases.

Developed by Nichibunken, the International Research Center for Japanese Studies, this page lists a variety of useful databases related to Japanese studies, including full texts, images, biographies, bibliographies, directories, and indexes, covering a wide range of subjects such as history, literature, art, geography, and social sciences.

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Academic Research Database Repository 学術研究データベース・リポジトリ

Academic Research Database Repository 学術研究データベース・リポジトリ.

Developed by the National Institute of Informatics, this resource provides integrated search service for 29 subject-specific indexes or bibliographies.

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CiNii – NII Scholarly and Academic Information Navigator

CiNii – NII Scholarly and Academic Information Navigator.

Developed by the National Institute of Informatics, CiNii is a tool to find articles published in Japanese academic society journals and university research bulletins. It also incorporates the National Diet Library’s Zasshi Kiji Sakuin (Japanese Periodicals Index) database.

NII states that CiNii has three main features:

  • “Large volume of article information – CiNii incorporates 12 million articles. Articles from different databases that have duplicate information are displayed as a single article.
  • Access to full text documents – Access to full text documents is possible with 3.2 million of the 12 million articles currently available on CiNii. CiNii enables you to search desired articles and obtain the full text of such articles. Through joint collaborations, we also provide links to navigate to full text documents, etc. on other services.
  • Displays citation information – Based on this citation information (References / Cited by), users can track down related articles.”

Please note that some full text articles are free, while other require payment.

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Hong Kong Literature Database 香港文學資料庫

Hong Kong Literature Database 香港文學資料庫.

Developed by the Chinese University of Hong Kong Library, “Hong Kong Literature Database is the first database on Hong Kong literature. The Database is powered by various searching functions. Full-text is available in a major part of the database.” It provides bibliographical records of articles published on the newspapers, magazines and journals as well as books and theses, totaling 500,000. It also has over 180,000 full text articles, but not all of them are freely available on the Internet.

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