Interactive Conversion System Between The Japanese Calendar, The Chinese Calendar and The Christian Era

Interactive Conversion System Between The Japanese Calendar, The Chinese Calendar and The Christian Era

Developed by the ECAI, Japan and hosted by the Osaka International University, this calendar conversion tool does exactly what its name suggests.

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Hong Kong’s War Crimes Trials (HKWCT) Collection

Hong Kong’s War Crimes Trials (HKWCT) Collection

This collection stems from a research project conducted by Suzannah Linton, a law professor formerly at the University of Hong Kong (currently at Bangor University  in UK). Professor Linton collected 46 case files of war crimes trials held by the British military in Hong Kong after World War II that involved 123 accused persons, all Japanese nationals. Due to the copyright restrictions, the actual case files can only be accessed at a university in Hong Kong, but the website makes freely available other materials in the collection, including detailed case notes, photographs from the same period, personal accounts, and a bibliography.

This seems the first such collection that has been digitized. Does anyone know similar collections on the web?

Densho Digital Archive

Densho Digital Archive.

This resource is part of Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project. The Archive “holds over 400 visual histories (more than 800 hours of recorded video interviews) and over 10,700 historic photos, documents, and newspapers. The archive is growing as Densho continues to record life histories and collect images and records. These primary sources document the Japanese American experience from immigration in the early 1900s through redress in the 1980s with a strong focus on the World War II mass incarceration” (Densho). To access the database, a user can either create a free account or use the Guest account provided by Densho.

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Barry Rosensteel Japanese Print Collection

Barry Rosensteel Japanese Print Collection.

This resource provides access to digital images of a significant portion of the Barry Rosensteel Japanese Print Collection, which was donated to the University of Pittsburgh in 2008. The Rosensteel Collection consists of a total of 126 woodblock prints.  “While the earliest print dates to 1760, most of the prints were produced in the 1800s, while others were created in the 1900s. The work of over forty artists is represented in the collection. The images portray Japanese culture through detailed depictions of portraits, landscapes, wildlife and theatrical performances, taking into account some of Japan’s rich history.” (University of Pittsburgh Library System)

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Kotobank

Kotobank.

A resource developed by Asashi Shinbun Company, it provides free access to 51 Japanese dictionaries and encyclopedias for about 470,000 entries. Users can search the dictionaries simultaneously or separately. In addition to dictionary entries, web search results will also be displayed for the search query.

The dictionaries in kotobank.jp include デジタル大辞泉百科事典マイペディア, デジタル版 日本人名大辞典+Plus, 朝日日本歴史人物事典, 美術人名辞典, and so on.

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Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Library Rare Books 京都府立医科大学附属図書館貴重書全文

Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Library Rare Books 京都府立医科大学附属図書館貴重書全文.

This resource provides full images of three medical books from the 19th century Japan:

満私歇児篤(マンスフェルト)氏講述 解剖學[講義録],
星野先生診斷學病理総論 全, and
醫學士加門桂太郎先生述解剖學五官器篇 脈管器圖.

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Nihon Gaiko Bunsho (1867-1926) 日本外交文書デジタルアーカイブ

Nihon Gaiko Bunsho (1867-1926) 日本外交文書デジタルアーカイブ.

Provided by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, this resource includes the digitized version of Nihon Gaiko Bunsho (documents on Japanese foreign policy), covering the Meiji and Taisho eras (1867-1926). Users can browse the volumes by downloading the required DjVu viewer, but will not be able to conduct full-text search. Toshio Takagi of Australian National University first reported this to the Eastlib listserv.

The print version of Nihon Gaiko Bunsho may be available in a library near you.

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